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  #1  
Unread 08-28-2010, 04:29 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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Default Buco Twinmaster Saddle Restore Project & Mods

I have recieved a Buco Twinmaster Saddlebag Restoration Project this week.
These bags are in sad but restorable condition. I will write about my progress and how I do some of my repairs. These bags will be finished with new chrome, a retro fitted mounting system that allows the wiring to pass through the mounts and 6 volt L.E.D. bulbs custom made for the beehive lights. But first some starting pics.
Here is a start pic of one of the bags. The bags gaskets will be stripped off.

Here is the real challenge. Someone made an attempt to shore up the worn mount inside the bag. A new mount will be fabricated and bushings will be inlayed into the damaged fiberglass.

Here is an example of the worn mounting hole outside of the bag.

What makes these bags a refinishing challenge is that someone blasted the Paint off of the fiberglass surface. It could be walnut or sand, but it left the bags with deep groves and erased the gelcoat. I will post pics after restoring the surface to a gloss.

Also there are many small holes drilled into the bags for wiring. With my system, no holes will be drilled into the bags for wires.

I will post my progress as I go along. A short few week project!
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  #2  
Unread 08-29-2010, 06:13 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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Time Stamp 8-29-10
The bags have been cleaned and the excess glue removed from the bag gasket. I very carefully use paint stripper to remove the old adhesive from the rim of the bag. I then use Westleys Whitewall Cleaner on the bags and scrub with steel wool. Some inside stains cannot be removed, but the bags are clean and dry, ready for repairs

For all of the fiberglass repairs and hole filling I use regular fiberglass resin found at any big box store or auto parts store.

For small drilled holes in the bag, just use masking tape as a backing on the inside of the bag. I break a wooden stirring stick and use it to apply small amounts of resin to fill and scrape the resin level

The mounting holes in the fiberglass were very worn. This comes from the metal inner support being worn out. The inner support was removed and a new one will be fabricated. Meanwhile the mounting holes in the bags will be filled and redrilled. But first they have to be enlarged and tapered to accept the next step. I use my dremmel with a grinding wheel as shown.

Tape the back of the hole with multiple layers of masking tape. Cut a small square of fiberglass woven cloth and depress in the hole. The exposed adhesive side of the masking tape will hold the cloth in. With scissors, cut small bits of fiberglass cloth into some resin and make a slurry. Add hardner and place into the depression over the cloth and work the slurry into the colth. This will make a lump to be ground off flush. This trick will reinforce the bond and leave a nice strong patch to be drilled out. This is a Spokes Special Technique.

Here is anothe technique. Here is a before pic showing a very thin and weak part of the bag at the tail light. The tip is also blown through.

I apply straight resin to the entire area to bond with the old fiberglass. I used masking tape behind the hole.

The surface of the bags are very rough from the sand of walnut blasting. Most people would use spot puddy to fill the groves. I do not. I use a commercial grade automotive filler. Here is a another Spokes Technique:
Apply 2 part polyester auto filler to the bag. Wait until the filler "gels" about 5minutes. After gelling use a sharp scraper to shave the surface faily smooth and to remove any excess. This technique saves sanding time.


More to come in the next time stamp
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  #3  
Unread 08-31-2010, 05:30 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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Time Stamp 8-31-10
All of the saddlebag hardware with the exception of the bottom bag clip is being chrome plated. The parts should be back to the shop in about 10 days.
The rumor that you cannot chrome plate the original lid latch will be put to rest. I will post a pic of the latch when I get it back.

No updated pics today. The bags are 60% completed. I will post pics soon showing the repairs and then primed. Incorporated into this thread will be a prime and paint lesson.

New mounting panels are being fabricated out of new galvinized steel. The mounting holes will have bronze bushings inlayed into the fiberglass. The new mounts will last 25 years or more.
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  #4  
Unread 09-01-2010, 08:23 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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Time Stamp 9-1-10

The bags are almost ready to be primed. These will be the last pics before the primer application.

This pic being held up to the light shows the mounting holes which were filled with fiberglass cloth and resin, now cured and sanded smooth. The holes will be re-drilled to accept the new mounting system.

Here is a shot of a repair, earlier shown as a blow through.

Here is a repair pic of one of the lids.

Finally the left bag with lid

The right bag with lid


Some more filling and sanding is in order. After every inch of surface is detail sanded, the bags will be primed with a 2 part primer. Once primed we will discuss priming and painting that will apply to fiberglass or metal
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  #5  
Unread 09-03-2010, 03:01 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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Time Stamp 9-3-10
I have to admit that I have had much fun with rumors that one cannot do something. In this case the rumor is: You cannot chrome plate a Buco Twinmaster Saddlebag Original Latch. The latch below proves differently


Here is a shot of the back.

For those of you who would like to know all of the metal hardware on a Buco Twinmaster Saddlebag, here is a pic showing all of the hardware newly chrome plated including my replacement light housings.


Back to the refinishing.
Priming. I prefer to use a two part PPG brand automotive primer. Basically the commercial primers have a heavier build and the hardner(the 2nd part) allows the primer to harden and dry fast. If you don't have a spray system, aerosol primers will work, but will take more applications and have longer drying time. Here is the very simple spray system I use.

The "system is just a $99.00 compressor, $15.00 touch up gun and a $7.00 in line air dryer. The spray gun will last for about 6 paint jobs. Also in the background is the PPG primer, reducer, hardner package.

I don't initially use primer to prepare for the final over coat of paint. I use primer to tell me where the flaws are. I always remember what an old bodyshop owner told me back in 1969. PAINT DON'T LIE! See this pic.


I will wet sand and prime 3 or 4 times. Any flaws after priming will be feathered out after applying Spot Putty

Another thing I need to point out is you should build a paint stand for your work. Here is a pic of an easy set up.

I paint my saddlebag projects upside down.


There is some mechanical work left to do. Here is a pic of a new fabricated inner bag mounting plate. The new mounting holes will be drilled using a mounting template. Then the mounting plate will be attached to the outside of the bag as a fixture to drill new holes in the fiberglass. Slightly larger holes will be drilled in the fiberglass to allow for bushings to be inlayed and glassed in.


Note. Always wear safety equipment when working with any paints and solvents. Always be aware of the fumes and the potential of fire. Always clean up and dispose of any contaminated paper/rags/solvent away from flame. Always wash before eating. Shower after every time you do any kind of sanding. Wash all clothes as soon as practical.

Last edited by Spokes; 11-17-2010 at 03:59 PM.
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  #6  
Unread 09-04-2010, 01:46 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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Time Stamp 9-4-10

Finish preparation of any painting project is the key to a super paint job. Often times folks are in a hurry to paint color and end up with a average or a so-so job.

The bags were primed and now it is time for wet sanding. I use 220 and 400 grit paper as needed. The 220 grit will be used for detail the first wet coat sanding. Overall 400 grit is used everywhere else. One big key is to get a retaining tray to keep the job neat.

Here is what the bags look like after the 1st wet sand.

The bags will be primed again, then again wet sanded. After the 2nd prime, spot putty will be used on any defects that may still remain. Then the bags will be again wet sanded.

Here is a shot of one of the bags after the 1st wet sanding and fresh water rinse. The bag is still wet and gives a clue how nice the finish will look.

Last edited by Spokes; 09-04-2010 at 01:47 PM. Reason: fix
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  #7  
Unread 09-05-2010, 11:26 AM
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Time Stamp 9-5-10
I just finished the second sanding. I know there are some places that need attention. Another trick is to paint the area's where you suspect more work is needed before overcoating the whole project.
This was the "before" pic

Last edited by Spokes; 09-05-2010 at 11:32 AM. Reason: add pic & more
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  #8  
Unread 09-07-2010, 10:55 AM
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Time Stamp 9-7-10

For my restoration projects I use acrylic enamel with a hardener additive. This technology is basically old school. I simply apply old school techniques and finesse to achieve what I want in a refinishing project.

Below are pics of the 1st coat of PPG Corvette White Acrylic Enamel.




Once again "Paint Don't Lie" applies to each coat of color. I will feather sand out any imperfections and recoat until I achieve the smoothest gloss possible.
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  #9  
Unread 09-08-2010, 06:12 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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Time Stamp 9-8-10
After the new internal mounting plate was fabed it was used as a template to drill new mount holes into the fiberglass.

All that is left now is to sand and recoat the bags until they are smooth and glossy. Then i will discuss the remounting of the hardware and wiring of the lights
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Unread 09-09-2010, 02:30 PM
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Time Stamp 9-10-10
The second sanding and the second coat of Corvette White has been applied to the bags. The camera cannot detect the remaining flaws that I see. Basically at this point I am chasing micro flaws that would only be seen on a sunny day and close up. The bags will rest for a few days until the second coat is hard. Then a 3rd sanding and a 3rd coat will be applied. Once the 3rd coat is hard then a light wet sand with 1200 grit, then 1800 grit to remove any remaing flaws. Once sanded and polished they will be reassembled and wired. A final pic will be posted before sending them back to their owner around the 17th of Sept.
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  #11  
Unread 09-14-2010, 12:40 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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Time Stamp 9-14-10
At the beginning of this project the bags had no finished surface. The sandblasting (or walnut blasting) had destroyed the gelcoat. This is the final coat of paint. This is the result of the effort as stated during this thread. The final finish is 4 coats of paint and 3 detailed sandings before the 4th application. After this is assembly and wiring.

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  #12  
Unread 09-17-2010, 02:26 PM
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Time Stamp 9-17-10
The bag restoration is complete. here are some final comparison pics.
Bad mount before

New fabed mount & fasteners

Before shot of the mounting side of the bag

After shot of the same side

Bag "before"

Bag "after"

Here is a shot of how I wired my retro-fitted hand built lights


To wire the bags I use a hollow bolt and pass the wire through it.

This is the end of this project
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  #13  
Unread 09-17-2010, 03:46 PM
wnbasac wnbasac is offline
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WOW Chip you diffidently have Mad Skills!!!

I'm sorry to say that these bags that Chip has been working on are mine. I bought them on Flea Bay and when i bought them they looked to be in good condition from the pic's they had posted. Well as you can see by Chips Resto Topic that they were anything but good condition! I hope that others can learn from my mistakes as Chip pointed out what to watch for and what it takes to restore a set of Buco Saddlebags.

I can't say enough of his Quality of Work and Knowledge! Chip also helped me out with my Blinkers, I had the OEM front set and he fabricated the rear set to match and polished the rear braces and front blinker housings as well - Beautiful

I HIGHLY recommend that you take advantage of him for your Polishing, Painting, Repairing and Parts Sourcing>

Pic's to come after i mount the beauties

Thanks Chip!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!

Lou
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  #14  
Unread 02-14-2011, 10:54 AM
bbap bbap is offline
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Amazing results! What do you use for the rivets (pop rivets or screws?) Also, what glue do you use to re-adhere the weather stripping to the bags? My weather stripping is pretty bad and they will leak....suggestions on that?

Great Job!
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  #15  
Unread 02-14-2011, 03:38 PM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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I used 3mm stainless button hex head screws, except for the new mounting panels. I don't use adhesive with the new gasket. The replacement gaskets I used don't need adhesive. IF I were to use adhesive, I would used rubber glue.
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