FourWheelForum  

Go Back   FourWheelForum > Motorcycles & Streetbikes! > 1969 Honda CL70 Scrambler!

1969 Honda CL70 Scrambler! My old dirt bike returns!

Reply
Thread Tools
  #1  
Unread 01-05-2012, 05:48 PM
daxsonvt daxsonvt is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 20
Default Some help needed

What is the best way to remove old gasket material from the mating surfaces of the engine parts. I'm having a hell of a time trying to get it off and I do not want to start scraping away.

Is there something good to spray on to break it up?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Unread 01-05-2012, 08:07 PM
Smithers's Avatar
Smithers Smithers is offline
Admin
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
Posts: 3,237
Send a message via AIM to Smithers Send a message via Skype™ to Smithers
Default

Here is basically what I do. I have an old paint scraper that is not exactly flimsy but it does have some give to it. I use that initially to remove most of the paper or whatever material is stuck on the alloy. I sharpen it a little every now and then but I don't like it too sharp or else it will cut into the soft alloy and cause you to put a nick into your machine. Then to really clean things up I get out some 3M abrasive pad and it takes the rest of it off as long as it's not too thick. Then to give it some shine some steel wool works great with some carb cleaner or whatever I have laying around. I just start working on it without soaking the leftover gasket in anything. You can soak it in a film of oil or some Goo-Gone I imagine.

Paint scraper with the yellow handle. That tool was found in my grandpas toolbox when I was a kid. It has helped clean up a lot of engines!



Then I have a shot here of the red 3M abrasive pad and the grey steel wool right next to it. This is all I used on this engine here and I did the cylinder head surface the exact same way. When I have a LOT of surface to clean up I have a right-angle air tool with a 3M 1.75" pad that spins pretty fast. It takes off the material really quick but they wear out fast at the same time. Those pads cost a few bucks and I hate ordering new ones so I only get that out to do some light finishing to make it look good.

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Unread 01-06-2012, 06:34 PM
daxsonvt daxsonvt is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 20
Default

Thanks for the info.

I started at it with a 3m pad I had laying around and it seemed to work, though slowly. I had my dremel tool out for some other work and in the box of attachments I found these things.

They had the same feel and consistency of the 3M pad so I decided to give it a go on a less important piece that could be replaced for less than the head. I only used the finer grit and it worked great. The wheel did wear kinda quick, but I was putting a fair amount of pressure on it to get it into some corners. Avoiding sharp corners, keeping the speed down, and keeping the pressure down and they should last long enough to finish everything.

I'll have pictures of everything and a longer description on my blog in the next few days.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.