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The Honda CA95 / Benly 150 Restoration The little brother to the CA160 in our family of Hondas

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  #1  
Unread 07-26-2011, 06:58 PM
Jetblackchemist Jetblackchemist is offline
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Lightbulb CA95, 6 volt to 12 volt Tutorial

Done.

Last edited by Jetblackchemist; 11-09-2012 at 09:55 PM.
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  #2  
Unread 03-24-2012, 11:17 PM
scott12544 scott12544 is offline
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is that really all there is to it. I have wanted to install HID headlight on my benly
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  #3  
Unread 03-25-2012, 07:36 AM
Coty_Jim Coty_Jim is offline
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What battery did you use?(model code if available) Are you comfortable using the original horn and starter solenoid? I am considering the 12V conversion, but I haven't found a similar sized battery. Do you have the part/model # for the headlight and the indicator lights (neutral, high beam, and speedo illumination). The suggestion for conversion to HID is a good one, I have converted my CBX and ST1300 to HID with great success. More light and less electrical draw. Not sure it is necessary for the CA95, since it will probably not be a night owl, but could provide more visibility during the daylight hours.
Thanks for any info you might have.
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  #4  
Unread 03-25-2012, 11:41 AM
Jetblackchemist Jetblackchemist is offline
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Done.

Last edited by Jetblackchemist; 11-09-2012 at 09:55 PM.
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  #5  
Unread 03-25-2012, 09:15 PM
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frappy frappy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetblackchemist View Post
... I suggest searching by the dimensions when looking and ...
Here's a link to a piece of Yuasa literature that provides measurements for all their currently available batteries. http://www.yuasabatteries.com/literature.php I've found it very useful when "upgrading" a motorcycle battery. After arriving at their website, click on the link entitled: "2011 Yuasa Battery Specifications & Applications (2.1 mb)". Happy hunting!
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  #6  
Unread 04-11-2012, 09:05 AM
scott12544 scott12544 is offline
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what about the charging system. the 6v output will never keep the 12v battery charged. you would have to put it on a charger every night.
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  #7  
Unread 04-11-2012, 09:15 AM
92merc 92merc is offline
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I believe that is what the new bridge rectifier is for. Taking the 10kv and changing it to 12V instead of 6V.
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  #8  
Unread 04-11-2012, 10:12 AM
comp_wiz101 comp_wiz101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scott12544 View Post
what about the charging system. the 6v output will never keep the 12v battery charged. you would have to put it on a charger every night.
The peak voltage output of the alternator is higher than 6V, but the battery acts as a regulator (load) to keep this lower. That's why you aren't supposed to run a bike like this without a battery (even if the ignition worked without it), it is designed to use the battery as a regulator.

Since engine is providing the same wattage @ 12V, doubling the voltage means current will be 1/2 the amount on 6V. (Because Power = Volts X Current). This is nice for a number of reasons, including lowering heat loss due to high current.

The newer rectifiers have a number of advantages, including lower heat, lower electrical noise, and higher voltage/current ratings.

I would recommend, if possible, including a 12V regulator in the circuit. It's not too likely to overcharge, but it's nice to reduce the odds of over driving the battery.
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  #9  
Unread 04-11-2012, 10:13 AM
comp_wiz101 comp_wiz101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 92merc View Post
I believe that is what the new bridge rectifier is for. Taking the 10kv and changing it to 12V instead of 6V.
Not exactly... a [silicon] bridge rectifier doesn't actually regulate the voltage down. It is more efficient, however, than the old selenium varieties. This leaves you with more power for driving the rest of the electrical system, instead of converting it into heat (That's why selenium rectifiers have those big heat fins).
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  #10  
Unread 04-11-2012, 07:10 PM
Jetblackchemist Jetblackchemist is offline
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Done.

Last edited by Jetblackchemist; 11-09-2012 at 09:56 PM.
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  #11  
Unread 04-13-2012, 11:13 AM
comp_wiz101 comp_wiz101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetblackchemist View Post
... you can use a regulator but you really don't need one.
Great to hear that it isn't a problem on these bikes. Thanks for sharing your experience.
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  #12  
Unread 04-15-2012, 04:40 PM
Jetblackchemist Jetblackchemist is offline
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Done.

Last edited by Jetblackchemist; 11-09-2012 at 09:56 PM.
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  #13  
Unread 05-26-2012, 01:03 AM
Jetblackchemist Jetblackchemist is offline
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Done.

Last edited by Jetblackchemist; 11-09-2012 at 09:56 PM.
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  #14  
Unread 05-26-2012, 04:12 AM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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I have been following this post with some intrest. Not that I am interested in converting from 6 to 12 volts, but just to see what happens.

I have cooked a coil by leaving the key in the on position and by random bad luck, the points were closed. I read earlier that you walked away leaving the key "on" and returning to that "smell" and seeing wax. I guess the lag time leaving the ignition "on" with 12 volts is shorter than with 6.


Thanks for the post. I am now convinced to leave my system alone and just cruise the bike in dry daylight trips.
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  #15  
Unread 05-26-2012, 04:22 AM
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Puzzleparadise Puzzleparadise is offline
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I have also followed this post and thanks to Jet I also converted over to 12 volt and never looked back..thanks for the info, it's appreciated!

Oh and I forgot to mention the 12 volt battery I'm using is a Yuasa #12N5.5-3B it was one he had off the shelf, (it has the polarity reversed from the original battery so it's installed with the terminals closer to the frame, so put a thick rubber pad against the frame to protect everything and it also keeps the battery from moving around a well!)

When I purchased the battery from my local Victory dealer he was convinced that the conversion wouldn't work! (He was convinced I was going to blow/fry every electrical component on the bike, lol)

Last edited by Puzzleparadise; 05-26-2012 at 04:36 AM.
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12v, 12v conversion, 6v to 12v, rectifier

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